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SFS Talkies @ The Arts House: DANCING CAT (PG)

What In a country that remains generally suspicious of cats, two South Koreans will take notice of the feline creatures roaming the streets for the first time.
When 28 June 2014 (Saturday) - 29 June 2014 (Sunday), 4:00pm (Sun); 7.30pm (Sat & Sun - SOLD OUT)
Where The Arts House
Screening Room The Arts House 1 Old Parliament Lane Singapore 179429
Admission

$12 (for public)

$10 (for students & senior citizens 60 years and above)

$8.50 (for SFS members and TAH members)

To purchase tickets: Online at [http://www.bytes.sg/booking/frmBuyTickets.aspx?EventID=588] OR The Arts House box-office.

 

DANCING CAT
Dir. Yun Ki-hyoung
2011 | South Korea | 76 min | PG

Awards: 21st Cairo Int'l Film Festival for Children (2012, Egypt), 3rd DMZ Korean International Documentary Festival (2011, Korea), 6th Busan International Kids’ Film Festival (2011, Korea), 11th Seoul International NewMedia Festival (2011, Korea), 8th Green Film Festival in Seoul (2011, Korea),11th Seoul Independent Documentary Film & Video Festival (2011, Korea) 

Cast:  Bessie, Blossom, Darth Snooze, Sweetness, Thundercat

Plot Outline:  Along the residential streets of South Korea, a poet and a director notice stray cats for the first time and it seems as if the cats have a story to tell.

They begin observing these cats on a daily basis and the stories of their feline neighbors begin to unfold. Cats roam the peripheries of the country and are perceived as dangerous or unhygienic.

This documentary delves into the lives of stray cats in South Korea, with the hopes of telling their long neglected stories.

Programmer's Note: By Eunice Lim (24 May 2014)
Along the residential streets of South Korea, a poet and a director notice stray cats for the first time and it seems as if the cats have a story to tell. 
Many stray cats roam the streets of South Korea.

Often considered to be dangerous or unhygienic, these cats have adapted to the hostile living environment. Two men will take notice of them for the first time and begin to see the world from their eyes.

This independent South Korean documentary investigates the lives of stray cats in South Korea, documenting the trials they face on the streets and the wariness they have towards humans. 

In the streets of Singapore, when we do chance upon a stray cat, few of us would spend time getting to know them, not to mention visit them on a daily basis and keep track of their well being.

What is revealed in this documentary is what we would realize about stray cats if we only spent more time observing them and caring for their fates.

Perhaps it is worthwhile to consider how we have been sharing our streets with our feline inhabitants and whether we can be more accommodating towards them.

The Cat Welfare Society will be joining us on both screenings for a post-screening panel. They will also be selling cat merchandise to raise funds for the welfare of the cats here in Singapore.

Love Kuching Project will be joining us on the Sunday screening for a post-screening panel and will be telling us more about their work in the rehabilitation of kittens in need, kitten adoption, and the sterilisation of stray cats.