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World Cinema Series: Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me

What At the heart of the immensely popular 1990s television series Twin Peaks was the corpse of Laura Palmer, a teenage homecoming queen who was found washed up on the banks of a river. Both her life and her subsequent death are shrouded in mystery, as seemingly innocent bystanders are gradually implicated in one way or another, unravelling the town's veneer of propriety and wholesomeness.
When 6 March 2012 (Tuesday), 7.30pm
Where National Museum of Singapore, Gallery Theatre
93 Stamford Road Singapore 178897
Admission

Admission for SFS members:
If you are an SFS member (normal member or Reel Card member), you can obtain a free ticket by flashing your membership card at the SFS desk at the theatre entrance. You may ask for up to 2 more tickets for your guests if you hold a SFS Reel membership card. Non-members may sign up at the SFS desk -- we will issue membership on the spot. Free seating.

Admission for non-SFS-members:
$8 / $6.40 Concession
*Prices exclusive of SISTIC fee

 

World Cinema Series
A programme of the National Museum of Singapore Cinémathèque

World Cinema Series is a monthly screening of works by the boldest and most inventive auteurs across the world, from renowned classics to neglected masterpieces. Witness the wonders, possibilities, textures as well as the revelatory moments that have contributed to the rich history of cinema. Take a leap of faith and discover the art of cinema that continues to affect and inspire us on the big screen -- as it was meant to be seen -- with the World Cinema Series, shown every second Tuesday of the month at the National Museum of Singapore.

 

 

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me
Director: David Lynch
1992 | USA | 135min | 35mm | Rating TBC
In English

Somewhere within the wilderness close to the Western fringes lies Twin Peaks, a town that figuratively encapsulates a lost trajectory of the American Dream. Much like a postcard that freezes the idealistic pursuit for happiness at a certain juncture of history, it features a picturesque landscape complete with hunting lodges, suburban homes, late night diners and cherry pies. Similarly, its inhabitants seem like stock characters from American soap operas. There is, however, something amiss in the community of Twin Peaks. While it gives off a sense of tranquillity and pastoral charm missing in modernised cities, it is also in close proximity to a repressed heritage lurking beneath the American dream, an unsettling nocturnal stain so terrible that it can only be understood in riddles.

At the heart of the immensely popular 1990s television series Twin Peaks was the corpse of Laura Palmer, a teenage homecoming queen who was found washed up on the banks of a river. Both her life and her subsequent death are shrouded in mystery, as seemingly innocent bystanders are gradually implicated in one way or another, unravelling the town's veneer of propriety and wholesomeness. David Lynch's feature-length prequel, Fire Walk with Me, departs from the meandering narrative of the television series and instead dives head-on into the tragic last days of Laura Palmer, revealing the enigmatic event that constituted the recurring themes of the series.

Yet an event is never concrete in the Lynchian universe. While laying bare the circumstances of Laura Palmer's death, Fire Walk with Me takes an unrestrained hallucinatory trip into the realm of her subconscious with its labyrinth of liminal spaces, doorways and a bestiary of creatures that soak up the horrors of reality only to flow back to the surface with a frightening intensity.

When the buzzing of hypnotic televisual feedback in the opening sequence is suddenly interrupted when a baseball bat smashes the television, Lynch's mission is clear. Rather than pinning terror on a malevolent metaphysical force, as the series eventually did, Fire Walk with Me which must be considered as one of Lynch's most brutal excursions, seeks to dispel illusion and reveal the real forces behind it: transgression and violence within the dark well of humanity; And within that, precious traces of love and goodwill, but more so, a desperate hope for transcendence.


About the director, David Lynch

David Lynch made his first short films while studying painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. With the success of The Alphabet (1968) and The Grandmother (1970), Lynch moved to LA to create Eraserhead (1976) his first feature which went on to become an international cult classic. His distinctive body of work such as Blue Velvet (1986), Wild at Heart (1990), Lost Highway (1997), Mulholland Drive (2001), and also the TV series Twin Peaks (1990-91) came to define a surrealistic topography of America rife with mystery and the potential for discovery, yet dangerously close to an underbelly of corruption. Lynch is also an ardent propagator of transcendental meditation through the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace, a coffee aficionado with his own signature blend, and a musician who has recently released his first solo album, Crazy Clown Time.