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World Cinema Series - Invasion

What the film is an allegory for eternal vigilance against totalitarianism
When 18 January 2011 (Tuesday), 7.30pm
Where National Museum of Singapore, Gallery Theatre
93 Stamford Road Singapore 178897
Admission

Free admission but members only -- flash your membership card to go in. You may bring up to 2 guests if you hold a SFS Reel membership card. Non-members may sign up online or at the door -- we will issue membership on the spot. No tickets will be sold. Free seating.

 

http://www.nationalmuseum.sg/nms/nms_html//invasion4(300).jpg

Set in the fictional city of Aquilea, Invasion tells the story of a city besieged by a powerful and unknown enemy and the courage of a small group of men who defend it to their death.

Taut and stylishly directed by first-time feature filmmaker Hugo Santiago with a story written by Jorge Luis Borges and Adolfo Bioy Casares, the film is an allegory for eternal vigilance against totalitarianism, and it prophetically anticipated the rise of the military government that will seize control of Argentina less than ten years later.

In the film, Lautaro Murúa plays Herrera, the charismatic leader of a band of resistance fighters who tried desperately to defend their city from a shadowy enemy represented by a group of anonymous men with identical tan suits. As his more and more his men are killed and captured, Herrera goes alone to an abandoned stadium to make a final stand against the enemy.

Shot in stark black and white with a soundtrack that combines tango arrangements with experimental sound effects, Invasion is a modern interpretation of themes of The Iliad celebrating and immortalising those who valiantly fight against oppression.

Invasion opened the first edition of Directors’ Fortnight in 1969, however the negatives of the film were stolen and the film was banned in 1974 by the Argentinean authorities. Since then the film has been impossible to see for years until its recent restoration in 2000.

Special thanks to Hugo Santiago, Sophie Faudel and Simon Fretel.