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World Cinema Series - Shoah (Reservations have closed)

What Shoah by Claude Lanzmann

When 11 June 2010 (Friday) - 12 June 2010 (Saturday)
Where National Museum of Singapore, Gallery Theatre
93 Stamford Road Singapore 178897
Admission

Free entry for SFS members. Members have to reserve tickets for event by emailing shoah@sfs.org.sg. Please indicate your name, membership no. and expiry date.
Deadline for reservations is Jun 4. Please note reservations for individual parts are not possible.

 

 

World Cinema Series (Jun) - Sold Out!

Please note that reservations have closed.



Dir: Claude Lanzmann
1985 | France | 550 min
In German, Hebrew, Polish, Yiddish and French with English subtitles 
Consumer Advice: Some disturbing content
 
Shoah

Date:  Part 1 - Jun 11, 7.30pm
 Part 2 - Jun 12, 10.30am - followed by hour long lunch break
 Part 3 - Jun 12, 2.30pm
Venue: The Gallery Theatre, National Museum of Singapore 

Director Claude Lanzmann will be in attendance


Free entry for SFS members. Members have to reserve tickets for event by emailing shoah@sfs.org.sg. Please indicate your name, membership no. and expiry date.
Deadline for reservations is Jun 4. Please note reservations for individual parts are not possible.


Admission may be limited by theater capacity.


Synopsis

“I would never have imagined such a combination of beauty and horror… A sheer masterpiece” – Simone de Beauvoir


Twelve years in the making, Claude Lanzmann’s Shoah is a monumental nine-hour film about the Holocaust. Considered as one of the most powerful documentaries ever made, it awakened a new consciousness about this great evil.


Eschewing historical footage and re-enactments, Shoah is comprised of interviews with witnesses, survivors and former Nazi camp commanders who experienced the Holocaust first hand. Through the filmmaker’s patient and sometimes relentless questioning, the testimonies reveal an emotional truth that covey an unparalleled and harrowing immediacy to the horrors of the Holocaust. Interspersed with the interviews are shots of the now empty and tranquil sites of Auschwitz and Treblinka, where the genocide took place. Flowers and grass now cover the mass graves, and the concentration camps themselves look like disused factories. Even the tracks that were used to transport the prisoners are still being used today.


Although it contains not a single image or footage of the actual event, the film evoke a far more powerful and devastating image of the Holocaust than any historical document. It achieves this by situating the memories of the past firmly in the present, and allowing the viewers to imagine and reconstruct the horrors of what happened. A haunting and unforgettable testament, Shoah is essential viewing for anyone who wishes to understand one of the greatest tragedies of contemporary history.