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SFS Talkies / World Cinema Series : Picnic at Hanging Rock

What A film that spearheaded the Australian New Wave in the 1970s, Peter Weir’s lyrical and haunting masterpiece remains as ineffable as the unanswerable mystery at its core. Based on the book of the same name by Australian author Joan Lindsay, the film tells the story of group of schoolgirls who vanished without a trace while on an expedition to an ancient volcanic outcropping called Hanging Rock on St. Valentine's Day in 1900.
When 10 June 2008 (Tuesday), 7.30pm
Where National Museum of Singapore, Gallery Theatre
93 Stamford Road Singapore 178897
Admission Free admission for Singapore Film Society members. Free seating. Please flash your SFS Membership card for entry.

Tickets for the public: $8 / $6.40 concession.
Counter Sales: Stamford Visitor Services Counter: 10am – 7.30pm;
Canning Visitor Services Counter: 10am – 5pm.
Online Booking: www.nationalmuseum.sg (click on Online Booking tab at the bottom of the webpage).
Ticketing Information: 6332 3659.
General Enquiries: 6332 5642.

Patrons are advised that a valid identity pass is required for all screenings.

 

A Programme of the National Museum Cinémathèque
Co-presented by the Singapore Film Society

Tuesday 10 June

Picnic at Hanging Rock
Dir: Peter Weir
1975 / Australia / 115 min / 35 mm / PG




“An elegant, mystical film…a marvellous blend of charm and suspense” - Daily Mail

A film that spearheaded the Australian New Wave in the 1970s, Peter Weir’s lyrical and haunting masterpiece remains as ineffable as the unanswerable mystery at its core. Based on the book of the same name by Australian author Joan Lindsay, the film tells the story of group of schoolgirls who vanished without a trace while on an expedition to an ancient volcanic outcropping called Hanging Rock on St. Valentine's Day in 1900.

Hypnotic and evocative, the film brilliantly captured the suffocating atmosphere of a strict boarding school, its simmering and suppressed sexuality, as well as the primal and unexplainable forces of the landscape. Like Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Avventura (1960) and Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon (1950), the mystery is open to numerous interpretations – both rational and illusory – and its allegorical overtones make it seem almost like a parable.

A testament to its enduring popularity and influence, every year the film is screened after twilight at the picnic grounds of Hanging Rock on St. Valentine’s Day, and echoes of it can be found in films as diverse as The Blair Witch Project (1999) and The Virgin Suicides (1999).

A post-screening discussion of the film will be led by David Stratton, a film critic for The Australian and a Film History Lecturer at the University of Sydney. David is a former Director of the Sydney Film Festival, and has served as President of the International Critics Jury for the Cannes and Venice Film Festivals.

Post-screening discussion supported by the Australian High Commission.


Peter Weir



Credited for renaissance of Australian cinema in the 1970s with (1975), Peter Weir has made a series of critically and commercial successful films both in his native country and in Hollywood. His first feature film was the cult classic Picnic at Hanging Rock, The Cars That Ate Paris (1974), and in the early eighties with films Gallipoli (1981) and The Year of Living Dangerously (1982), launched Mel Gibson as an international star. Weir’s subsequent films in the eighties, Witness (1985), The Mosquito Coast (1986) and Dead Poets Society (1989) established his reputation as a major Hollywood director. He received Academy Award nominations for Best Director for both The Truman Show (1998) and Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003).